Thursday, November 6, 2014

How we evaluate a Website




User Context- The most important factor when evaluating Web sites is your search, your needs. What are you using the Web for Entertainment, Academic work, Hobbies or a vocational interests.Traditionally very strongly text-based.  of an academic journal with a popular magazine.

Web Context- Some of the visual distinctions that signal the nature of content in print sources hold true on the Web as well, although, because the Web encourages wider use of graphics, Web versions of printed works usually contain more graphics and more color than their print counterparts. Color graphics appeared on the New York Times Web site before they appeared in the printed New York Times, for instance.
 
Evaluation Criteria
  • Author
  • Date of Publication
  • Edition or Revision
  • Publisher
  • Title of Journal
  • Intended Audience
  • Objective Reasoning
  • Coverage
  • Writing Style
  • Evaluative Reviews

Evaluating Web Pages: Questions to Ask & Strategies for Getting the Answers:
  • What can the URL tell you?
  • Who wrote the page? Is he, she, or the authoring institution a qualified authority?
  • Is it dated? Current, timely?
  • Is information cited authentic?
  • Does the page have overall integrity and reliability as a source?
  • What's the bias?
  • Could the page or site be ironic, like a satire or a spoof?
  • If you have questions or reservations, how can you satisfy them?
 Evaluating Information Found on the Internet
  • Authorship
  • Publishing body
  • Point of view or bias
  • Referral to other sources
  • Verifiability
  • Currency
  • How to distinguish propaganda, misinformation and disinformation
  • The mechanics of determining authorship, publishing body, and currency on the Internet. http://ow.ly/wryFE